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It has a double and opposite meaning, depending on the tradition followed: the modern and more common meaning is to divide equally the total cost between all the diners; the other is the same as "going Dutch".

This can lead to misunderstanding.), literally 'make half-[and]-half', which means each one pays an equal portion of the bill.

In a group, going Dutch generally means splitting the bill equally.

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In Austria, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, and Switzerland, the practice of splitting the bill in restaurants is common, though often everybody pays for themselves.

In a courtship situation where both parties have a similar financial standing, the traditional custom is that the man always pays, though some, including etiquette authorities, consider it old fashioned.

It's also not unacceptable to pay for elders among the group if the invitation has been extended by some one younger (say a niece taking her aunts and uncles out for dinner).

In Bangladesh it is common to use the term je je, jar jar () 'his his, whose whose'.

The Oxford English Dictionary connects "go Dutch" and "Dutch treat" to other phrases which have "an opprobrious or derisive application, largely due to the rivalry and enmity between the English and Dutch in the 17th century", the period of the Anglo-Dutch Wars. The gambling term "dutching" may be related to "go Dutch", as it describes a system that shares stakes across a number of bets.

Another possible origin is double Dutch, the jump-rope variation in which partners simultaneously participate.

"Going Dutch" (sometimes written with lower-case dutch) is a term that indicates that each person participating in a group activity pays for themself, rather than any person paying for anyone else, particularly in a restaurant bill.

It is also called Dutch date, Dutch treat (the oldest form, a pejorative) and doing Dutch.

A folk etymology is that the "Dutch" reference derives from Dutch Schultz, a New York gangster of the late 1920s to mid-1930s, who may have used dutching to profit from gambling on horseracing, though his nickname derives from Deutsch ('German'), in reference to his German-Jewish background.

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